Together.

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The five of us knelt by the couch in our family room. Our hair was blonder and our skin more tan than three months before when summer began. Now it was the night before school started back in session. The eve of routine and alarm clocks.

My husband asked if I’d be the one to pray aloud for the family as we prepared for the next morning and new season of life. I agreed, but took a deep breath first as the thoughts of all the transitions to come filled my mind.

Our oldest child would be heading to middle school in the morning at a somewhat ungodly hour. Many days he’ll leave before the sun comes up. He had practiced his locker combination and reviewed his new schedule sufficiently, yet it felt like the unknowns still trumped our preparation.

Our middle child was off to second grade, where reading skills and independence increase at a surprising but encouraging rate. She’s turning into a little lady right before my eyes.

And the biggest transition that was looming over me and causing my shoulders to be tense with dreaded anticipation was sending our youngest child to Kindergarten. After twelve years of staying home full-time with my children, I felt a sadness about my impending empty day-time nest.

Finally I began to pray aloud. My voice quivered a few times as thanked God for His goodness and the gift of a wonderful summer. I had to swallow several times and clear my throat as I asked Him to guide our children this school year and to give them each the two things I most often request on their  behalf: wisdom and courage.

Wisdom to know what to do and the courage to do it. 

As I said “Amen” my son glanced my way to verify his suspicion that I was holding back the tears. I shrugged and made small talk about getting up to bed. Transitions are hard enough for the kids without them realizing Mommy is about to melt.

Before they got their last drinks of water for the evening and headed up the steps we gathered in a circle and put our hands together. We were as ready as we could be to face the newness.

Now five days later with a week of school under our belts we’ve dealt with a few highs and lows. We’ve rejoiced about sitting next to best friends and eating really good middle school cafeteria lunches (really?). We’ve also had sobbing at the bus stop wishing for more days at home with Mommy. My heart and neck muscles have been wrenched even further. We’ve had excitement over new opportunities to play in the school band, and disappointment for getting scolding for taking too many grapes in the 2nd grade lunch line. Oh, the grapes of wrath!

But we have each other still.

We’ve got each other’s back and we’ve wiped each other’s tears. We’ve delivered forgotten items to the school and slapped each other on the back with joy over new successes.

And so dear family, my favorite home team, here’s to a great school year and to acceptance of all the transitions that comes our way.

May we have the wisdom to know how to live well, and courage to make it happen!


This post is linked up with the Five Minute Friday blogging community. Each Friday a one-word prompt is given here and bloggers are challenged to write for about five minutes about whatever come to mind based on the word. This weeks’ word: TEAM

 

 

My Heart Will Go On.

Author Elizabeth Stone is quoted as saying,

“Making the decision to have a child is momentous. It is to decide forever to have your heart go walking around outside your body.”

I would add that watching the kindergarten-sized version of that heart get on the bus for the first time is just plain painful. At least it was for me.

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I will never forget the emotions that welled up inside of me the moment I saw that big, yellow beast come bellowing toward my son. Ok, maybe it wasn’t bellowing, but it was getting closer and closer. And when it stopped in front of us, with it’s little red stop sign flippantly waving hello, I thought I might be a goner.

How could my sweet little baby boy, the one who smelled like bath lotion and rice cereal, be walking up the bus steps? Did school really have to start today? Couldn’t we wait until after Christmas, or five or six more years? Is it really that important for our kids to know how to read and write and draw a triangle?

Yes, I guess it is important. But, as I watched the wheels on the bus go ‘round and ‘round with my baby boy inside I tried to hold back the tears. My husband, who was going into work late that morning so that he could be there to watch this momentous occasion, shook his head and grinned at me. He knew better than to say his thoughts out loud. Mommy is fragile right now. Handle with care.

But low and behold, my baby boy made it through his first day of kindergarten with flying colors. And what’s even more amazing; I survived too!

I guess it’s just like Céline Dion says; near, far, wherever you are… even if it’s off to your first day of a new season of life….my heart will go on!